Pipelines and Electric Cars

It has come to my attention that there are many that suggest that electric cars are the answer to pipeline problems. After all they don’t need gas. I have heard, though I was unable to confirm it, that among them was the energy secretary, Jennifer Granholm.

If Granholm was among them, she should be fired. She is supposed to have some working knowledge of energy. Here’s an alert for all who have thought EVs are the solution to pipeline problems. Almost all electricity originates from oil or natural gas. If the oil line stayed down for too long, they would have had to start shutting down parts of the electric grid, then eventually all of it.

Then where will you go to charge your electric vehicle?

As a side note, Granholm has allegedly invested heavily into an electric car company. There are two things I have to say about that. First, it is a dumb investment at this time. It will take decades before EVs will be practical. Second, it would appear as if it was not ethical. She ought not be invested in anything involved in energy or she should resign her post immediately. I think they call that sort of thing a conflict of interest.

Then again, she does have a D after her name. She will be able to get away with it.

Revisiting the E-car

I say E-car because someone apparently took my advice and started racing them. I saw the other day that they raced SUV s through the Arabian deserts. Then, a few days ago, they were racing cars that weren’t that different than the Indy cars, of course, with the exception that they were powered electrically.

It was a little odd to watch them while the only noise they made was from the transmissions and I think they were amplifying that. The noise was not a rumble or roar but a buzzing, sort like the toy cars. I do wonder what the on-watchers thought of that.

Still, they had other limits. Mostly the range. While the Indianapolis has the three hundred, it appears that the e-cars will never go beyond the E-100. What is it? I’m not sure, the La mans 500? I’m not a big car racing fanatic. Still, it would appear that it would be limited to the E-La mans 100.

I do have some solutions for them, that is if they will listen to me, the one without any letters after my name. First they need interchangeable batteries. Instead of charging the batteries, they would change them out during pit stops. Perhaps it could be done with a small crane or maybe they could simply drive the E-auto under a building with the appropriate equipment. The exhausted battery would be pulled out and a fully charged one could be dropped in. It might take about the same time as to replace tires. Perhaps the one part that would take the longest would be attaching the terminals. I don’t know. It sounds to me as if some experiments are needed. I don’t have the money for the research but I would guess to make sure of the connection, nuts and bolts would be needed. The battery pack would have to be fastened in too. You would not want one of those things flying around after an accident.

Then, who knows, maybe we could have thousand mile races, for those willing to endure them, both for the drivers and spectators. The nice thing is that what they could learn during the races. They might put it to use in the private E-autos.

For instance. Instead of driving into a service station and saying, “Fill it up,” we would say, “Replace the battery pack.” Sorry, there would be no self service stations. Too dangerous.

I wish I had thought of the idea but I didn’t. Someone else thought of it first. The advantages are many. First, the owner of the car doesn’t own the batteries. That drastically reduces the price of the car. Instead, they are leased. Each car would have a power meter and the owner would pay the price of the electricity as we pay our electric bill now. Instead of the car having a limit of 300 miles, it could go clean across country and back again, clean; without emitting so much as a puff of smoke in any form.

There are two problems remaining: cost and service stations that will stock enough batteries to get the job done. Oh. there is one more problem. We don’t have the electric grid to support the idea.

So. We need a drastic change to the cars, a drastic change to the service stations, and a big beefing up to the grid. I’m sure we can deal with it. We can get on it right away, except no one seems to have a clue, especially the ones with all the letters after their names.

Electric Car Range

I heard a spokesman for Volkswagen the the other day talking about an electric car they will soon produce and sell for 30,000. I get it. Everyone is climbing on the bandwagon. Moreover they have hopes of letting the feds help pay for the car.

However, I wish I had been there to challenge one of his statements. I can’t remember exactly, but I think he said the car would have a range of 250 miles, although it might have been 300. He cited the idea that most people don’t drive more than 50 miles each way to work. It seems they did some research on it and that makes it so.

I disagree with him in two respects. There are thousands, perhaps tens of thousands who drive over 100 miles each way to work. On a hot day where such a person would have to use his air-conditioning, he might be cutting things a little close, especially if he spends an hour or so traveling at a snail’s pace in traffic. If he is impeded by a traffic accident, he might end up having to pull over a call a tow truck after running out of electricity.

But it is far more than that, People do go on vacations from time to time. In order to do so, they might drive 500-700 miles in one day. With the electric car, they would have to plan on 250 miles at a time. On the other hand, they could go down to the rental agency and get a car that can go the extra mileage.

Then there is the person who uses his car in his work. While I was repairing computers, it was quite common for me to drive 500 miles in one day. That does not include 60 miles to and from home. I would suspect that a car like this would not be good for certain people in sales. I can’t think of any other such things but I would suspect there are many who can.

It is just the sort of thing that happens when people make decisions and don’t have to answer for them. Of course the spokesman is convinced it is good range. He doesn’t have to drive the car. If I buy the car, he is not the one who gets stuck without juice. That would be me.

I assure you, if he had to drive such a car, he would have an entirely different attitude. On the other hand, he might already realize the stupidity of the statement and is just saying what the company told him to say. To be sure, there are people around who have no difficulty in doing such things. Why not? It’s no skin off their nose.

Electric cars or fine for those who can afford such a second car. At this point, that does not include me. Get the range up to 600 miles and I might consider it. And, oh yes. They are going to have to get that price down some too. I can’t afford 30,000, even if it is quiet.

Electric VW Van?

I noticed the advertisement for the new VW van.  It looks pretty impressive.  I tried to get some info on it.  I just might try to buy one, as long as the price isn’t too high.  The problem is that I don’t know how expensive it will be.

I had one of the old vans.  My wife and I really liked it.  Unfortunately,  I could not afford to rebuild the engine every other year.  Also, the heater left a lot to be desired.  Even in southern California weather, the heater was very deficient.  it was worse when I went up to Big Bear Lake where we about froze.

I must admit, though, it handled the snow very well.  I drove through 8 and 9-inch snow with ease.  I was a little scared that we would get stuck, but the van just kept right on going.

Also, I must put a good word in for the dealership in Alburqurque.  While traveling, we drove into the dealership at 4:45 PM with a bad coil and left at 5:30 with a good one.  Never figured on that.  And, by the way, the price was reasonable too.

If I had one more complaint, there was no A/C.  If there was, I suspect the engine would have carried the load.  Push come to shove, the one fault the vehicle had was an undersized engine.

I knew a guy that put a Porche engine in one.  The engine hung out the back, but he said he had no lack for power.  Still, I imagine keeping the cabin warm was difficult.

I have often wondered why VW never really attacked the power/heat problem.  I don’t know.  maybe this one will.

At any rate, when they release the electric version, I will take a serious look at it, especially if they can keep the price around 30 K.  If they can come up with some solutions for battery charging problems, I will definately take a serious look.  If the dumb politicians keep talking of increasing the gas taxes, the sales contract is as good as signed.

An Alert to the Citizens of N.Y. City

Trucks and freight trains run on fossil fuel.  Trucks and freight trains carry food into the city of New York.  If we do away with fossil fuel (Diesel fuel) the people will starve.  Simple fact.

…and people people have a hard time believing my books.  At least I label my books as fiction.  The Dummycrats expect us to accept this fiction as science.

Bottom line… it is about power, not saving the planet.

Electric What?

A week or so ago, I heard that Elon Musk would do business with the Defense Department by helping to build things for national defense.  At first, though grateful, I didn’t think much of it.  To be sure, he is already building rockets, but those have no direct military purpose.

Then the thought occurred to me that he might build electric powered tanks, you know, the things that run around with big guns on them.  If such a vehicle could be built that would have a range of three or four hundred miles, it would have many advantages.

First they would be quiet.  A track version would make hardly any noise, only the track itself.  If a wheel version were built, it would make no noise at all.  Talk about sneaking up on someone.

Second, it would neither need an intake for the motor nor an exhaust.  It would mean it could operate almost anywhere, even submersed under shallow water.  Naturally, there would have to be an air supply for the crew, but that would hardly be a problem.  It also means that the tank would be, to some degree, NBC proof (nuclear, biological and chemical).

Reliability would be a big factor, as long as the batteries were reliable.  Electric motors can be built that last just almost last forever.  Diesel and jet engines can be very expensive to maintain.  Worse, repairing them can take a long time.  The electric motors are inexpensive, small and easily replaced.  If repair is desired, that is usually simple too.

I am not totally sold on the idea, but, if anyone builds them, we should.  Maybe it is worth a little research.  Maybe for the rest of the military vehicles too.  I understand those Teslas can really move out.  Can you imagine an army that can move along at over a hundred miles an hour, without making much noise.

I would hate to think that we don’t make them and the bad guys do.  I would hate to put our soldiers in such a position.